IResult – A Robust Option Type for C#

Jeremy Madden. CodeProject. 2017-06-09.
The features introduced in C# 7.0 make it just a little easier to introduce some functional-programming style patterns into enterprise C# code. One of the features that had me particularly excited was pattern matching, particularly in switch blocks.
IResult utilizes some of these new features to emulate an the Option type from F#, including helper functions like Bind, Map and Fold.

[IResult – A Robust Option Type for C#]

Top .NET Software Errors: 50 Common Mistakes and How to Fix Them

Angela Stringfellow. Stackify. 2017-06-13
Developing in .NET provides several powerful benefits, including less overall code, improved security, ease of updates/changes, and language independence.
That said, the system isn’t without errors and problems. From common exceptions to coding mistakes to incorrect assumptions, most of these issues come down to programmer error.
The list below shares the 50 top .NET software errors from around the web. It includes exceptions, broken data bindings, memory leaks, LINQ issues, mistyping errors, and dozens more. We also look at ways to fix each one.
When you’re ready to start coding, download our free guide to .NET Profilers for some insider knowledge and everything you need to know about code profiling for .NET. And while you’re at it, be sure to check out Prefix, our own lightweight profiler for .NET and Java developers. (And, if you’re thinking about .NET Core, read our opinion on why it’s the next big thing here.)

[Top .NET Software Errors: 50 Common Mistakes and How to Fix Them]

The .NET Language Strategy

Mads Torgersen. .Net Blog. 2017-02-01.
I am constantly aware of the enormous impact our language investments have on so many people’s daily lives. Our languages are a huge strength of the .NET platform, and a primary factor in people choosing to bet on it – and stay on it.
I’ve been here on the .NET languages team at Microsoft for more than a decade, and I’ve always seen us have developers’ interests first and foremost in our minds as we moved the languages forward. The open source revolution (of not just the .NET languages but the whole .NET stack) has improved the conversation dramatically, and – I think – helped us to make better choices. However, we haven’t always been good at sharing how we make those decisions: Our language strategy; the framework for how we think about each of our .NET languages and chart their evolution.
This post is meant to provide that additional context for the principles we use to make decisions for each language. You should consider it as guidance, not as a roadmap.

[The .NET Language Strategy]

Digging Deeper into the Visual Basic Language Strategy

Anthony D. Green. The Visual Basic Team. 2017-02-01.
Today Mads made an excellent post about our overall .NET Language Strategy. As I know this will raise a lot of questions in the VB community I wanted to take an entire post on the VB team blog to dive deeper into how VB fits into that strategy and why and what that means in practical terms for us as a community.

[Digging Deeper into the Visual Basic Language Strategy]

Programming in the Point-Free Style

Eirik Tsarpalis’ blog. 2017-04-02.
Point-free programming (or point-less programming, for the more cynically inclined) is a paradigm that advocates the formulation of programs by means of function composition. In the point-free style programs avoid explicitly nominating function arguments (or “points”), deriving instead complex function definitions by means of applying higher-order combinators on simpler functions.
[ Eirik Tsarpalis’ blog]